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18 Spanish Expressions to Stop Saying “Pienso que”

pienso que in Spanish

If you have a pre-intermediate/intermediate level of Spanish, you should start learning new Spanish expressions to stop saying “Pienso que”.

Why? Because native speakers don’t just say “pienso que” all the time. We use a wide range of expressions that aren’t precisely transparent.

Besides, it will make you sound more natural and competent speaking Spanish.

You may want to impress a future examiner. You may want to level up your Spanish so you can engage more with the culture.

Regardless of your motivations, if you’re here, that means you want to improve.

So, that’s why, in today’s post, I’ve gathered 18 Spanish expressions to stop saying “Pienso que”.

You’ll find the expression, the English equivalent, relevant comments to use these expressions properly, and examples.

I’ve tried to use the same example so you can clearly see how different expressions can change a sentence.

IMPORTANT: focus on the expressions without subjunctive if you’re not intermediate yet.

Now, let’s upgrade your Spanish!

1) OPINO QUE…

The verb “opinar” means to give your opinion about something. It’s very similar to opine in terms of spelling but they’re different.

“Opinar” is a neutral verb. You can use it in informal and formal contexts. However, to opine is rather formal.

A true English equivalent would be “It is my opinion that”…

And bear in mind: this verb is used with indicative mode:

Opino que la gente usa mucho el teléfono hoy en día (nowadays).  

BUT! If you use this expression negatively, use the subjunctive mode instead:

No opino que la gente use mucho el teléfono hoy en día.

 

2) CREO QUE…

The verb “creer” means to believe. A good equivalent would be “I believe that”.

This expression is used with the indicative mode too:

Creo que la gente usa mucho el teléfono hoy en día.

However, like the previous expression, “creo que” is used with the subjunctive if you use it negatively:

No creo que la gente use mucho el teléfono hoy en día.

 

3) CONSIDERO QUE…

“Considerar” has the same meanings as the English verb to consider.

The main difference is the tone. “I consider that” may sound a bit inflated when speaking to friends. However, the Spanish verb is fit for both informal and formal contexts, whether spoken or written.

Like the previous expressions, if you use “considero que” affirmatively, you should use it with the indicative mode. If not, subjunctive mode.

Example: Considero que la gente usa mucho el teléfono hoy en día.

No considero que la gente use mucho el teléfono hoy en día.

 

4) CONSIDERO IMPORTANTE QUE…

This Spanish expression is a bit more complex than the previous one.

It contains an adjective before the word “que”. In this case, I’ve chosen “importante”, but you can use any suitable adjective for your own sentence.

Anywa, such addition leads speakers to use the expression with the subjunctive mode, whether you say it affirmatively or negatively.

Example: (No) considero importante que la gente use el teléfono todos los días.

 

5) ME PARECE(N)

“Me parece” is a bit different to the others: it’s truly versatile and suitable for every situation. Unless you want to impress someone with showy complex expressions in formal contexts, of course.

There are different ways to use affirmatively (that is, with indicative mode):

    1. Placing a subject/matter you’re talking about at the beginning. La moda me parece muy aburrida.  Los concursos me parecen programas muy aburridos.
    2. Me parece que + indicativo. Me parece que la moda es muy aburrida / los programas son muy aburridos. Careful with this one! If you use “no me parece que”, you should use the subjunctive mode: No me parece que la moda sea aburrida / No me parece que los programas sean muy aburridos.

 

6) ME PARECE ESENCIAL/ IMPORTANTE QUE

“Me parece” can also appear with adjectives before the word “que”.

Adjectives usually have the effect of bringing the subjunctive to the conversation:

 (No) me parece esencial/importante que la gente use el móvil todos los días.

I’ve chosen the adjectives “esencial” and “importante” but you can use any other relevant adjectives. For example: “primordial” (fundamental), “vital”, “esencial”, “fundamental”…

 

7) ME PARECE DE BUEN/PÉSIMO GUSTO QUE

This Spanish expression means “It appears to be good/bad taste to me that…”.

So, this is clearly a good expression to tell your opinion about ideologies, people’s choices, etc.

It’s also one of those expressions that only native speakers use. Just saying.

And, sorry, it’s always used with the subjunctive mode too.

Example: Me parece de pésimo gusto que la gente use el teléfono en clase. Me parece de buen gusto que la gente no use el teléfono en clase.

 

8) ME PARECE DE PERLAS / DE CINE QUE

Let’s start with some vocabulary: A “perla” is a pearl. But the expression “de perlas” means handy, welcome, opportune.

Similarly, while “cine” is clearly cinema, the expression has another meaning. “De cine” means amazing, surprising.

Therefore, this Spanish expression to stop saying “Pienso que” means “It seems handy or amazing to me that”.

Let’s see some examples:

Me parece de perlas que la gente use el teléfono todos los días (positive, great, handy).

Me parece de cine que la gente use el teléfono todos los días (amazing, shocking).

As you’ve probably noticed, it’s used with the subjunctive mode as well.

 

9) ME PARECE BIEN/MAL QUE…

This Spanish expression is slightly different to the previous one. First of all, it’s always used in singular. Secondly, the adverbs “bien” / “mal” ( and other similar adverbs too) are placed after “me parece”.

This little addition always forces the mode to be subjunctive:

Me parece bien/mal que la gente use mucho el teléfono hoy en día.

 

IS THIS A BIT DIFFICULT? THE NEXT EXPRESSIONS ARE FOR YOU.

From expression 10 to expression 15, you can apply the following rules:

  • Mostly place them at beginning of a sentence
  • Include a comma afterwards
  • Use them in both formal/informal contexts
  • Stick to the indicative mode (yaay!).

But, there’s a couple to thing bear in mind with the Spanish expressions to replace “Pienso que”.

It’s true that you can place these expressions in the middle of a sentence. However, punctuaction changes and the sentence can sound a bit intricate.

Moreover, some native speakers may use the subjunctive with these expressions. How? By starting the sentence with “que”. Here you have an example: En mi opinión, que la gente use mucho el teléfono es muy perjudicial.

Finally, these expressions can be followed by a whole sentence like “la gente usa mucho el teléfono”. But you can say them too before using infinitive verbs (Desde mi punto de vista, usar mucho el teléfono es perjudicial).

 

10) A MI PARECER,  (literal translation: to my judgement, equivalent: the way I see it)

A mi parecer, la gente usa mucho el teléfono hoy en día. A mi parecer, la gente no usa mucho el teléfono hoy en día.

11) A MI MODO DE VER, (literal translation: to my own way of seeing things, equivalent: the way I see it)

A mi modo de ver, la gente (no) usa mucho el teléfono.

12) A MI ENTENDER, (literal translation: to my understanding, equivalent: as I understand it).

A mi entender, la gente (no) usa mucho el teléfono hoy en día. 

13) EN MI OPINIÓN, (literal translation: in my opinion).

En mi opinión, la gente (no) usa mucho el teléfono hoy en día.

14) DESDE MI PUNTO DE VISTA, (literal translation: from my point of view/perspective).

Desde mi punto de vista, la gente usa mucho el telefóno móvil.

15) TAL Y COMO YO LO VEO, (equivalent: as I see it).

Tal y como yo lo veo, la gente usa mucho el teléfono móvil.

You may wonder, though: what’s that “tal” there? It’s a very common Spanish word with several meanings. If you’re interested, take a look here.

If, however, you want me to explain it properly with plenty of examples, tell me on the comments or send me a message here.

Now, let’s continue with other expression (not always with the indicative mode).

 

16) ME RESULTA SORPRENDENTE/IMPRESIONANTE QUE

“Resultar” means to cause an impression on someone in the context of expressing yourself. That’s why this expression means “It seems surprising/impressive to me that”.

If you want to know the other meanings, have a look here.

Again, this expression contains an adjective so you should expect the subjunctive mode.

Example: (No) me resulta sorprendente/impresionante que la gente use el teléfono todos los días.

 

17) ME DA LA IMPRESIÓN DE QUE…

This Spanish expression means “I get the impression that”. The literal translation would be “the impression that… is given to me” but that sounds weird.

Good news, this expression can be used with the indicative mode if you use it affirmatively.

Example: Me da la impresión de que la gente usa mucho el teléfono todos los días.

However, if you use it negatively, you should use the subjunctive:

No me da la impresión de que la gente use mucho el teléfono todos los días.

 

18) ESTOY CONVENCIDO/A DE QUE…

Convencer is the Spanish word for to convince. That’s why this expression can be translated as “I’m convinced that”.

You should bear in mind two things:

    • The ending of the word “convencido/a” should suit your gender
    • You should use the indicative mode if you use it affirmatively. If you use it negatively, use the subjunctive mode instead.

Examples: Estoy convencida de que la gente usa el teléfono todos los días. No estoy convencido de que la gente use el teléfono todos los días.

 

Now you know 18 Spanish expressions to stop saying “pienso que”. That means you’re better equipped to polish your Spanish and sound more natural.

Would you like to practice with me? Let me know in the comments:

¿Cuáles son los beneficios de usar el móvil para aprender español?

40 Spanish Phrases to Sound like a Spaniard

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